Series Post on Driving: Part II. How to say “Ticket” in Chinese?

√ Are you guys good drivers?

√ Have you ever been ticketed because of illegal parking or not obeying the traffic rules?

√ Do you still remember the Chinese saying for “driver’s license” from my last post?

√ What’s more, do you want to know how to say a “ticket” in Chinese?

Registration Plates in F.L. & N.Y.

Registration Plates in F.L. & N.Y.

No matter where you are, illegal driving behaviors or habits will end up getting yourself a “ticket”. That’s Never good. Today you will learn how to say a “ticket” in Chinese.

Since you guys have already got the common things one needs to do to get his driver’s license in China and the U.S. in the last post, I will go on with the DIFFERENCES part of driving test now as I promised last time.

Differences in Taking A Driving Test in China and the U.S.

A STOP Sign

A STOP Sign

(What I want to stress in particular here is that my experience of taking the driving test in the U.S only applies to the test rules in the state of Florida. You guys may find something different from your place since different states have their own rules regulating the driving test. )

1. The Road test. 

After the written test, one also has to pass the road test before you get your driver’s license.

In China, we actually have two parts in the road test section: the first part is the “court test”, which refers to the test that the want-to-be drivers take the driving test in the test court of the DMV; the second part is actually the REAL “road test” since the test-takers need to take the test by driving the car on the highway.

However, the road test in the U.S. only doesn’t incorporate the second part we mentioned above. The test takers can get their driver’s license as long as they survival the test court road test.

2. The Traffic School.

The traffic schools in the U.S. is recommended where as the traffic schools in China is mandatory, since the Chinese want-to-be drivers can only schedule the written and road test in a traffic school.

3.  Scheduling A Test Appointment. 

The want-to-be drivers can schedule a written test, or both the written and the road test online (Click Here for the official website of DMV in Florida) and in the traffic schools as well.

Please refer to the next section “The Test Schedule,” for the test scheduling in China.

4.  The Test Schedule. 

In the U.S., the want-to-be drivers can schedule and take both the written and road test in one day (the written test in the morning and the road test in the afternoon), as long as they think they are well prepared.

However, people in China must take their written test at least half a month earlier than the road test. What’s more, if the period between one’s written test and the road test is longer than 2 years, his original written test score will be invalid and he has to retake the written test again.

5.  Vehicles Used in the Test. 

In China, the vehicles used in the driving test are provided by the DMV; whereas the test-takers in the U.S. need to provide vehicles themselves when they take the driving test.

Interesting, huh?

I am always excited about discovering all these fascinating cultural differences, which is also the fun part during language learning. Hope you enjoyed today’s lesson.

Test Court in DMV in Gainesville, FL

Test Court in DMV in Gainesville, FL

Got more interesting experience preparing for your driver’s license or taking the driving test to share with us?

Know more about taking a driving test in other states in the U.S.?

Your comments and ideas are warmly welcomed from the bottom of my heart!

by Xuan♥.



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8 comments on “Series Post on Driving: Part II. How to say “Ticket” in Chinese?

  1. one of my friend received countless tickets for more than 2000 pounds in UK(illegal parking, faked driving license,faked insurance,etc), of course, he never paid the fine.

"Any idea, plan, or purpose may be placed in the mind through repetition of thought." ---By Napoleon Hill

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